Tag Archives: 3D Printing

CAD & 3D Printing: Parametric CAD with OpenSCAD

The past year (2018/2019) I printed with my own designed 3D Printers with various printheads and required for each variant a dedicated Part Cooler, and I realized it was worth the time to approach this in a parametric manner using OpenSCAD, using the “bull horn” design and so I came up with a general approach, and as a result was able to create various variants for my use-cases:

part-cooler-selection2

  • Custom Triple (& Dual) Micro Swiss hotends (3 nozzles, 3 heatsinks)
  • Chimera 2-in-2 (2 nozzles, 1 heatsink)
  • Cyclops NF 2-in-1 (2 intake, 1 nozzle, 1 heatsink, non-mixing)
  • E3D Volcano (1 nozzle, 1 heatsink, large nozzle diameter)
  • E3D V6 Lite (1 nozzle, 1 heatsink, small / medium nozzle diameter)
  • a few other specialized setups

Needless to say, the proven design allowed me to quickly design and print a new variant, and have expected results when using the part cooler – which is a huge time saver.

Yet, one drawback is obvious: in order to adapt a new variant, one requires the surrounding parts like heat sink and nozzle as a model or design it yourself (which can be time consuming as well) so the proper variables can be found to render the part cooler for the setup.

After I designed my 3D Printers also in parametric manner, like the Ashtar K (Prusa i3-like) 380x300x300mm build volume or Ashtar C (Core XY) 380x400x380mm build volume, using this parametric approach for a Part Cooler as well, turned out quite successful too.

It makes sense to develop and design a parametric piece which

  • maintains a few constraints, a general form, a base functionality
  • requires a few variables to adapt certain customization, sometimes it makes sense to introduce a lot of variables, and while testing and adapting customized pieces, some variables may become constants and unforeseen variables become more important

It certainly requires expertise about the piece in order to discern the constraints from the variable aspects while still maintaining its base functionality.

That’s it.

PS: See Parametric Part Cooler project page for new developments.

3D Printing: Triple Nozzle Printhead

Updates:

  • 2020/12/29: published finally, also released files on Thingiverse
  • 2019/09/24: initial draft (not yet published)

After working on dual CR10 nozzle / Micro Swiss nozzle setup, I considered to add a third nozzle:

Triple CR10  Hotends / Micro Swiss Hotends

In order to pack the 3rd nozzle, I put it in front of the dual setup, and use one heatsink fan cooling all three heatsinks:

screenshot-from-2019-05-21-21-16-04.png

The Parametric Part Cooler has the settings part_cooler(m=50,wx=50,yoff=17,sq3=1,wx=54).

Final smooth part cooler and fully assembled:

Screenshot from 2019-06-17 07-22-05
Parametric Cooler for Triple Micro Swiss Hotends
Screenshot from 2019-06-17 07-21-14
Parametric Cooler for Triple Micro Swiss Hotends
Parametric Cooler for Triple Micro Swiss Hotends

Download

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3865972

Assembly

Assemble 3 nozzles in one go, and adding heatsink fan mount:

adding 50mm fan on top:

and with the dedicated Part Cooler using 5015 fan blower:

I recommend cover all nozzles with silicon socks when using the part cooler. Optionally LED strip mount in case you want some light on all three nozzles.

Leveling Three Nozzles

It’s essential that all three nozzles have the same distance to the bed, otherwise inactive nozzles might touch and tip-over a piece while printing. See Dual Nozzle Setup for the procedure.

Third Hotend Wiring

One requires a board with 3x MOSFETs to heat all three heatblocks and 3x thermistors inputs, like RUMBA or TANGO (Open Source variant of RUMBA) controller board or extend it with dedicated parts:

  • per heater: STP55NF06L (MOSFET) with 10R, 100K on a Dx (digital output); LED with 1.8K is optional
  • per thermistor: 4.7K with 10uF on a Ax (analog input)

for wiring see RAMPS 1.4 schematic as reference:

See Also

That’s it.

3D Printing: Dual Nozzle Printhead

Once I discovered the Micro Swiss Hotend clones aka CR10 hotends, I realized they had properties which were ideal for dual nozzle printheads:

  • the nozzle is vertically fastened with a single screw
  • 2 or more nozzles can be easily vertically calibrated to have the same distance to the printbed

The proper way includes two additional screws which stabilize the heatsink with the heatblock, but those are left out for this use-case.

Dual Hotend Mount

A very minimalistic lightweight mount with 40mm fan in mind:

The nozzle X offset is 24mm in the ideal case.

Part Cooler

Adapting my Parametric Part Cooler with part_cooler(name="dual swiss",wx=50)​:

Download

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/tool/dual-extrusion-with-2x-cr10-micro-swiss-hotends-with-part-cooler

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3633941

BOM

  • 2x M3x12 or 14 to mount to 30mm X carriage, possible 2x M3 nuts
  • 4x M3x20 (mount 2x “CR10 hotends”)
  • 4x M3 nuts
  • 4x M3x10 or M3x12 if you use part cooler too (mounting 40mm fan)
  • 1x 40×10 fan
  • 1x 50×15 fan blower (optional as part cooler)

Assembly

  1. assemble both hotends to the X carriage without PTFE inserted yet
  2. move Z down until one hotend reaches bed (truly touch)
  3. open worm screw of the other hotend so the nozzle drops to the bed as well
  4. close worm screw firmly
  5. move X carriage 2mm or more up
  6. insert PTFE and fasten firmly (I recommend https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1993384 2x PC4-M10 = PTFE remains intact) and insert filament
  7. perform test print

X Offset

You can define X offset via Gcode (e.g. as start gcode):

M218 T0 X0
M218 T1 X24 Y0

given T0/Extruder 1 is left, and T1/Extruder 2 is on the right.

Since “CR10 hotends” are really cheap and not precisely machined, there is too much margin in the mounting 3mm holes – hence, you likely have more or less of 24mm X offset, and possible even Y offset as well. Use a 2-color calibration model to tune the offsets.

Usage

Comparison Dual/Multi Color/Material Extrusions

blue = relevant positive
red = relevant negative

Independent Dual Extrusions (IDEX)

  • complex setup
  • moderate cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • dual heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block 1)
  • no oozing over print
  • no inactive nozzle traveling
  • reliable 2)

★★★★★

Dual Hotends 2-in-2

  • simple setup
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • dual heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block
  • inactive nozzle oozing over prints
  • inactive nozzle travels over print
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Chimera 2-in-2

  • simple setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • single heatsink
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block
  • oozing of inactive material
  • inactive nozzle travels over print
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Cyclops 2-in-1

  • simple setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • normal retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • clone: unreliable

★★★★ (clone)

Cyclops NF 2-in-1

  • simple setup
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • complex retraction
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Diamond Hotend 3-in-1

  • complex setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • 3 heatsinks
  • tricky retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Multiple Switching Extrusions (MSE) 2-in-2, 3-in-3, 4-in-4

  • moderate complex setup
  • requires additional servo or motor
  • extendable 2, 3, or 4 colors/materials
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • multiple nozzles / heatblocks / heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block 1)
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • no inactive nozzle touching print
  • reliable 2)

(rating comes later)

Y Splitter x-in-1

  • simple setup
  • extendable 2, 3, or 4 or more colors / materials
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • complex retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Footnotes

  1. in theory no purge block, but if ooze shields are shared among switching extrusions (more than 2 extrusions) there may be cross-contamination between colors/materials
  2. the printheads individually are proven to be reliable

Hints:

  • single heatblock = same print temperature
  • dual heatblock = different print temperatures possible
  • dual nozzle = different nozzle sizes possible

See Also

That’s it.

3D Printing: Diamond Hotend Part Coolers Design Reviews

The past weeks (2019/09) I adapted existing Part Cooler designs, and redesigned them in order to work with the Diamond Hotend, as I have been searching for a good part cooler option and did not succeed with what’s out there already.

So here my 3 designs so far with a short review of their use quality:

Dual (or Single) Short Fan Shrouds

At the first sight this looks a promising design, but in reality there were major drawbacks:

  • adjustment of height (vertical) was critical and required fine-tuning
  • tendency to cool down the nozzle instead of the molten filament, in particular at lower layers near the bed
  • max cooling was 35% with my 5015 blowers

Rating: ★★★★

See details at Dual Short Fan Shrouds.

Ring Cooler

As next I designed the ring cooler, with small holes around the nozzle, also adjustable in the height (Z), but the cooling wasn’t really sufficient, as the nozzle still was cooling off a lot (no more than 45% cooling fan with 5015 blower was possible) – quite a disappointment for the rather sophisticated setup, but this general “ring cooler” design has failed for me also for other printheads like E3D V6 or so, and I switched back to “bull horn” like fan shroud.

Rating: ★★★

See details at Ring Cooler.

Single Directional Cooler

This rather simple design turned out the best option so far:

  • wide: 5015 blower runs at 80% without cooling the nozzle too much
  • narrow: 5015 blower runs at 50% without cooling the nozzle too much
  • creates sufficient disturbance around the nozzle to cool opposite side as well

and the XYZ 20mm Hollow Calibration Cubes came out quite well, on all 4 sides the letters were printed OK – not as good as E3D V6 and other printheads.

Rating: ★★★

See details at Directional Cooler.

Addendum: Dual Directional Cooler

Although it seemed logical to use two direct cooler, but the amount of air around the nozzle in operation was too much, and it required 20% fan cooling so the nozzle was still properly heated, but this was too low to provide any sufficient part cooling. So this option, without silicon sock on the Diamond Hotend, is not suitable.

Rating: ★★★ 

Summary

The winner is the Directional Part Cooler as it brings the cool air close enough where the molten filament exits the nozzle, without affecting the bare nozzle too much. As mentioned, either way a silicon sock would be recommended when using a part cooler with the Diamond Hotend – so far (2019/09) there is no commercial source but DIY approach with this thing.

As you can see I used simple E3D V6 Fan mount in combination of LED Strip holder to lighten up the tip of the nozzle and the printing operation.

That’s it.

3D Printing: Diamond Hotend Directional Part Cooler

Diamond Hotend Part Coolers Design Reviews:

This is the 3rd option for a Part Cooler for Diamond Hotend I designed, a pointy directional approach using again 5015 blower:

Screenshot from 2019-09-11 08-55-14Screenshot from 2019-09-11 08-55-30

Assemble

Functional Setup

Parts

screenshot-from-2019-09-13-17-45-31.png

Printable:

  • diamond_cooler_shield_blower-2mounts
  • diamond_cooler_5015-mount-inset-right
  • diamond_direct_part_cooler
    • print without support but with additional brim to increase adhesion of 1st layer
    • print with 0.4mm nozzle / line-width, with a good slicer this gives 3 perimeters for the model with 0.2mm or 0.25mm layer-height
    • -narrow: use ~50% fan cooling, position as low to the nozzle height as possible (e.g. 2mm above, not less, not more)
    • -wide: use ~80% fan cooling: more tolerant on vertical position / height
  • optional:
  • optional (recommended):

Vitamins (Non-Printable):

  • 5010 fan (main heatsink fan)
  • 5015 blower
  • 3x M3x20
  • 2x M3 nuts

Download

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/tool/diamond-hotend-directional-part-cool

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3855947

Throttle Fan & Positioning

Even though the air output is close to the nozzle tip, you might reduce the fan

  • -narrow: use ~50% fan cooling, position as low to the nozzle height as possible (e.g. 2mm above, not less, not more)
  • -wide: use ~80% fan cooling: more tolerant on vertical position / height

to avoid cooling the nozzle and run into “THERMAL RUNAWAY” error – or you use a Diamond Hotend silicon sock, then you likely are able to use 100% cooling fan.

XYZ Hollow Calibration Cube with 3 Colors Mixed

The actual success of this setup is seen in this test cube (printable with 0% infill):

The “X” and “Y” junctions are quite well printed, not as good with a “bull horn” part cooler as with E3D V6 setup.

Addendum: Dual Directional Cooler

Although this looks like a nice setup, the overall output of air to the nozzle is overpowering and cools off the nozzle too much. The cooling fan, in my case, required reduction to 20% to avoid “THERMAL RUNAWAY ERROR”, but at 20% the cooling effect on the extruded filament was less optional than with a single directional cooler – therefore this option isn’t recommended, unless you have a silicon sock over the nozzle.

 

That’s it.

3D Printing: Diamond Hotend Ring Cooler

Diamond Hotend Part Coolers Design Reviews:

After the “Diamond Hotend with Dual 5015 Fans” I thought of using a Parametric Ring Cooler and use a single 5015 blower fan:

Screenshot from 2019-09-10 03-10-20

Screenshot from 2019-09-10 03-10-29

and actually printed and assembled:

20190910_050608

20190910_051222

20190910_051600

Parts

Screenshot from 2019-09-10 11-22-25

  • 1x diamond_cooler_shield_blower-2mounts
  • 1x diamond_cooler_5015-mount-inset-right
  • 1x ring_part_cooler
  • 3x M3x20 to mount 5015 blower
  • optional (recommended):

Best print ring_part_cooler in white PLA, as it obstructs the nozzle quite a lot and if you use LED strip to lighten up the nozzle, white PLA might help to keep the brightness.

Pros:

  • adjust vertical distance of ring to bed/nozzle

Cons:

  • vertical position only adjustable when 5015 blower is deattached

Download

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/tool/diamond-hotend-ring-part-cool

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3853962

 

Addendum: With LED Strip

If you like light near the nozzle, there is ring_part_cooler-x=12,led=true model which looks like this:

Use adhesive LED strip of 50mm length, and tape it underneath, and use some isolated wires to fasten the strip:

 

That’s it.

 

3D Printing: Diamond Hotend Dual Short Fan Shrouds

Diamond Hotend Part Coolers Design Reviews:

The past months (2019/09) I used a temporary setup for part cooling as most designs I explored for part cooling for Diamond Hotend did not work for me – so I finally I remixed an existing design in order to use 5015 blower fans and the “BQ fan shroud”:

20190907_081956

20190907_072421

20190908_093821

Parts

Screenshot from 2019-09-10 11-03-15Printable:

  • 1x diamond_cooler_shield_blower-2mounts
  • 1x diamond_cooler_5015-mount-inset-left
  • 1x diamond_cooler_5015-mount-inset-right
  • 2x bq_extruder_Tobera or bq_extruder_Tobera-clean(air outputs)
    • -clean​” version requires glueing but has no internal obstacle
  • optional LED strip:
  • optional (recommended):

Vitamins (Non-Printable):

  • 1x 5010 fan (main heatsink fan)
  • 2x 5015 blowers
  • 2x M3x16 (each 5015 mount)
  • 1x M3x14 (each 5015 mount, mounting bq_extruder_Tobera)
  • 2x M3x10 or x12 to (each 5015 mount)
  • optional: 4x M3 nuts (within diamond_cooler_shield_blower-2mounts)
  • optional (but recommended): Diamond Hotend silicon socks

Pros:

  • elaborate setup
  • adjustable height (Z) for 5015 blowers

Cons:

  • elaborate setup (same as ‘Pros’)
  • height adjusting only reachable when 5015 blower is detached
  • without nozzle socks don’t use 100% fan, but 20-30% depending on the 5015 blowers in use – otherwise it will cool nozzle down and you get “THERMAL RUNAWAY ERROR”

Assembly

  1. insert M3 nuts into diamond_cooler_shield_blower-2mounts
  2. use 2x M3x12/14/16 to attach diamond_cooler_5015-mount-inset
  3. adjust height as you like (enable part cooler and check air direction)
  4. use 2x M3x16 to attach 5015 blower
  5. use 1x M3x14 to attach bq_extruder_Tobera and simultanously attach 5015 blower too

Fan Positioning

After a few tests I found the ideal vertical positioning of the fans:

  • most vertical top of the fans (like the above photos indicate) at 25% max cooling fan (your percentage may vary)
  • any other vertical position lower in theory should give more surrounding cooling, but in reality the air flow bounces back to the nozzle and cools it down (without socks) much faster

At a later time I may provide alternatives for the bq_extruder_Tobera air output.

Download

https://cults3d.com/en/3d-model/tool/diamond-hotend-short-fan-shrouds

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3846993 (thingiverse is broken 2019/09)

How I Did It

screenshot-from-2019-09-07-05-56-39.png

Remixed in TinkerCAD

 

That’s it.

3D Printing: Ashtar K Mod: X-Motor Mount / Belt Repositioned

Introduction

For the past 9 months (2019/08) I printed with two Ashtar K printers, where the X belt was routed above the 2020 extrusion:

Pro:

  • easy access (X motor & X carriage belt mount)
  • stabilizes the X carriage vertically

Cons:

  • bending of the mount

And the bending of the mount became an issue more and more, as I kept tighten the belt and bend the mount more; time to redesign the part.

Update 2021/01/19: I resurrected the piece for the Ashtar K/M IDEX and improved the strength for its use-case.

New Option: Routing Belt inside groove of 2020 Profile

First I used T shaped 2020 aluminium profiles and the nylon wheels did have little surface to ride, hence, I wanted the belt also function as vertical stabilizing. Once I replaced the X beam with V shaped 2020 profile, and V shaped wheel in the V modules riding on the profiles, I thought to reposition the belt into the groove of the V 2020 profile, and so reposition the X motor mount. So I merged the horizontal 2020 mount with the motor mount in one, plus adjustable Z stopper:

Screenshot from 2019-08-22 07-32-01
20190820_191658

which gave the desired stiffness of the part I sought.

Pro:

  • remains stiff
  • easy to mount & accessible (belt, Z stop screw)

Cons:

  • larger part, 2020 mount and motor mount combined

X Carriage Beltmount

In order to route the belt in the groove of the 2020 profile for the X carriage itself, a rather delicate piece was required, mounted at the backside of the X carriage V-module; I use a M3 to fasten the belts:

Assembled

Part names with variables:

  • xcarriage_short_hmount_motor_2020(zstop=true): main motor mount with 2020 profile mount combined
  • xcarriage_beltmount_2020(th=32.7): new belt mount on the X carriage, th default at 32.7mm, but one needs to measure the total thickness of the V modules acting as X carriage
  • pulley_holder_2020(): right side of the belt routing
20190831_185419
20190831_180455

That’s it.

3D Printing: Cyclops NF 2-in-1 Printhead

Sourcing

After my bad experience with the “Cyclops/Chimera” clone (2-in-1 with mixing capability), I purchased (June 2019) the improved “Cyclops” which resembles the “Cyclops NF 2-in-1” or “LERDGE 2-in-1 V2” , so I name this variant “Cyclops NF 2-in-1“:

which can be ordered at AliExpress (affiliate links):

and uses E3D V6 nozzle (clone) and 30x10mm fan on top. The two mounting holes are 24mm apart and fit the Prusa i3 X-carriage.

Further, the two filaments cannot be mixed like the original Cyclops but either filament A or B can be fed into the nozzle, but not both at the same time. Also, one can print with one filament solely, a 2nd filament must not be present.

Pros:

  • affordable
  • simple setup
  • single filament printing possible without 2nd filament being present

Cons:

  • cannot mix colors
  • long retraction required for tool change (>34mm)
  • long transition purge (~55mm)
  • custom PTFE or nylon piece in the heatbreak (not easy to source)
  • uncoordinated retraction can cause one filament blocking another

Model & Part Cooler

I quickly modeled the heatsink in OpenSCAD:

so I was able to adapt my Parametric Part Cooler with following settings part_cooler(name="cyclops nf",m=30,wx=25,yoff=10):

and the printed assembly:

Download

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3680090

Full Assembly

I finally turned the heatblock around (from the default orientation), so I could see the nozzle better and the LED strip shining more direct on the nozzle and bed.

Operation

The long tool switching retraction of > 34mm imposes quite additional risk of jamming combined with temperature sensitivity: depending on the temperature the pulled back of end of filament changes shape, and may not able to re-enter at next tool switch – so I’m a bit skeptical on the reliability – time will tell.

As I use print3r solely (without GUI), I set following in the printer profile:

# -- slicer=slic3r, slic3r-pe and prusa only:
retract_length_toolchange = 36

and a small macro named e2-nf-t1.ini for my Ashtar C #1 (380x400x380) Core XY style:

prepend_gcode="G91\nT0\nG1 E20 F100\nG1 E-36 F3000\nT1\nG1 E36 F3000\nG1 E60 F100\nG90\nG92 E0\n"
end_gcode="G1 Y{$machine_depth-10} F6000\nG92 E0\nG91\nG1 E-2 F2000\nM104 S0\nG1 E-36 F3000\nT0\nG1 E36 F3000\nM84\nG90\n"

which I use as print3r @e2-nf-t1 ... in case I like to print with 2nd filament only:

  • start:
    • T0: purge 20mm
    • T0: retract -36mm
    • T1: forward 36mm
    • T1: purge 60mm
    • reset E meter and go back to absolute positioning/extruding
  • end:
    • go back to Y380 (absolute)
    • T1: retract extrusion -2mm
    • T1: retract -36mm quick
    • T0: forward 36mm quick
    • switch off heating and motors

This way I keep T0 as default, and on-demand switch to T1 only with @e2-nf-t1 macro in operations. One case is not covered: if I abort a print then T1 is still active in the printhead and manually needs to be retracted (future print3r version will resolve this).

print3r --device=tcp:printhub:0 --printer=ashtar-c-1-e2 --random-placement --scad --slicer=cura print 'for(i=[0:2]) translate([50*i,0,0]) cylinder(d=5,h=40)'

Comparison Dual/Multi Color/Material Extrusions

blue = relevant positive
red = relevant negative

Independent Dual Extrusions (IDEX)

  • complex setup
  • moderate cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • dual heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block 1)
  • no oozing over print
  • no inactive nozzle traveling
  • reliable 2)

★★★★★

Dual Hotends 2-in-2

  • simple setup
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • dual heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block
  • inactive nozzle oozing over prints
  • inactive nozzle travels over print
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Chimera 2-in-2

  • simple setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • non-mixing
  • dual nozzles
  • dual heatblocks
  • single heatsink
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block
  • oozing of inactive material
  • inactive nozzle travels over print
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Cyclops 2-in-1

  • simple setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • normal retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • clone: unreliable

★★★★ (clone)

Cyclops NF 2-in-1

  • simple setup
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • complex retraction
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Diamond Hotend 3-in-1

  • complex setup
  • clone: low cost
  • original: high cost
  • mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • 3 heatsinks
  • tricky retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Multiple Switching Extrusions (MSE) 2-in-2, 3-in-3, 4-in-4

  • moderate complex setup
  • requires additional servo or motor
  • extendable 2, 3, or 4 colors/materials
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • multiple nozzles / heatblocks / heatsinks
  • normal retraction
  • no purge block 1)
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • no inactive nozzle touching print
  • reliable 2)

(rating comes later)

Y Splitter x-in-1

  • simple setup
  • extendable 2, 3, or 4 or more colors / materials
  • low cost
  • non-mixing
  • single nozzle
  • single heatblock
  • single heatsink
  • complex retraction
  • purge block required
  • no oozing of inactive material
  • moderate reliability

★★★★★

Footnotes

  1. in theory no purge block, but if ooze shields are shared among switching extrusions (more than 2 extrusions) there may be cross-contamination between colors/materials
  2. the printheads individually are proven to be reliable

Hints:

  • single heatblock = same print temperature
  • dual heatblock = different print temperatures possible
  • dual nozzle = different nozzle sizes possible

That’s it.

3D Printing: LED Strip Fan Mount

20190612_121717Early on I used this setup and extended the options further – a 50mm long LED Strip Fan Mount – which mounts directly on

  • 30x10mm fan (like E3D V6) or
  • 40x10mm fan or
  • 50x10mm fan

either below or above (changes distance) and lightens print head or print bed of a 3D printer.

BOM

  • printable LED Strip Mount (30mm/40mm/50mm fan)
  • 50mm long / 8mm wide LED adhesive strip
  • tape to insulate wires on LED
  • insulated wire or zip-tie to fasten wire

Screenshot from 2019-06-12 10-26-17-cropped

LED Strip Mount: 30mm, 40mm and 50mm fan variant

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Step by Step

The final step you can decide to put the mount above or below the fan, which gives some flexibility. The mount is just 1mm thick so it won’t matter so much on the existing setup.

Usage

 

That’s it.